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A message from the Chairman of Friends of Lord Hill’s Column

Formed in October 2013, the Friends of Lord Hill’s Column are pleased  to invite members of the public to the Lord Hill Hotel in Abbey Foregate, Shrewsbury for an Inaugural Meeting to be held at 7pm on Thursday 27 February 2014.

The Chairman, the Reverend Richard Hayes, will give an illustrated talk on Lord Hill and his significant achievements as a General in the Peninsular Wars and at Waterloo, and Shrewsbury’s extraordinary initiative in erecting a Column in his honour.

The  whole project, from its inception in December 1813 to its completion in June 1816 took only 30 months – and the actual time of construction was only 18 months.  The year 1814 was devoted to fund-raising by the people of Shropshire – and it is to them that the Friends look now to invite them to this meeting and to become  A FRIEND FOR A FIVER.

Our plan of campaign is that we wish to support Shropshire Council in the work of replacing the existing crumbling statue of Lord Hill with a new exact replica in the shortest possible time. Will you become a Friend and encourage your Shropshire neighbours to do the same for a one-off payment of £5.

Wouldn’t it be great if we could get the job done by 18 June 2016 – 200 years to the day after the completion of the Column?

The fund-raising campaign begins on 27 February. Come along to the meeting at the Lord Hill Hotel – its free, and the bar will be open. There is ample parking.

A representative of English Heritage will speak also about the importance of the Column (Grade II* listed) and the statue of Lord Hill and its restoration.

Properly publicised, our campaign to restore our Shropshire hero’s statue will bring visitors to our county town of Shrewsbury and help boost our local economy. ‘Daddy’ Hill was beloved by his soldiers on account of his care for their well-being. Can 10,000 of us care for him now?

See you at the Lord Hill Hotel on Thursday, 27 February at 1900 – a chance to learn more and be proud of our great Shropshire heritage!

5 comments to A message from the Chairman of Friends of Lord Hill’s Column

  • Hugh Battersby

    1. Where do I send a contribution, please ? And to whom do I make a cheque payable ?

    2. I do feel that the option of granite should be further explored. Any statue is not going to be a genuine replica and we should surely not repeat the original mistake of using a material, selected then for cheapness and for the ease of producing a matching cast for the Hawkstone monument, which has not stood the test of time. Plastic is a complete no no. GRP is an excellent material for short-life buildings, because it has a short life. Sir Frederick Gibberd’s favourite material GRC (Glass Reinforced Cement), which he used to such disastrous effect on paddy’s wigwam, does not even have a short life. I have experience of it!

    Regards.

    • Peter Hayman

      Granite is the more durable and cost effective option.
      The tallest monolithic statue in the world is located in Shravanabelagola India, it was carved between the years 978 and 993 CE out of a single block of granite. This statue, situated at the top of a hill is 60 feet tall and can be seen from 30 km away.
      The oldest monument in London is reputed to be Cleopatra’s Needle, dated 1500BC and made from a 60 ton piece of Granite, shipped to London as a Gift from Egypt after being in the desert for well over a thousand years.
      A replica light grey granite statue of Lord Hill can be hand carved and supplied to the site in six months from the date of its commission, and for less than half the cost of a Coade stone replacement. Granite is a tried and trusted natural solid highly durable material, so where is the logic in replacing a failed Coade stone statue with another of the same for more than double the cost of a granite replacement, and which will take three times longer to have completed and put in place.

    • peter hayman

      ” I do feel that the option of granite should be further exsplored ”
      I totally agree with Mr Battersby, the possibility of a replica Lord Hill being made in Granite should be considered for many sound and logical reasons. Especially when considering it can be done in Granite for less than half the cost of a Coade stone replica, and in one third of the time.
      I hear on the news that among many other cuts, the Council are removing support for a number of Boys clubs, why not continue the fund raising, and any money saved by going the granite route could be used to support one or two of these young peoples clubs, or even sponcer a craft apprenticeship or two. I am sure Lord Hill would like that idea, Lord Hill deserves a statue that will be made in a material that is durable and reliable, just as he was.

  • Peter hayman

    Granite is the more durable and cost effective option.
    The tallest monolithic statue in the world is located in Shravanabelagola India, it was carved between the years 978 and 993 CE out of a single block of granite. This statue, situated at the top of a hill is 60 feet tall and can be seen from 30 km away.
    The oldest monument in London is reputed to be Cleopatra’s Needle, dated 1500BC and made from a 60 ton piece of Granite, shipped to London as a Gift from Egypt after being in the desert for well over a thousand years.
    If a replica light grey granite statue of Lord Hill can be hand carved and supplied to the site in six months for £150,000 which is less than half the cost of a Coade stone replacement, then what is the real driving force or where is the logic in replacing a failed Coade stone statue with another of the same, and who does it benefit. ?

    • peter hayman

      Sorry about the repeated post of the 14/15, it was not not intentional. perhaps the administrator can delete the one I submited on the 15th for clarity of debate.
      many thanks peter.

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